AN ALIEN VICE
Human sexuality and the pornography of abduction


The following essay is an attempt to establish the parallel role and content of the abduction narrative and pornography. By this I do not mean that the numerous books, articles and documentaries allegedly reporting the true abduction and sexual abuse of humans by extraterrestrial beings are deliberately written to provoke sexual arousal. Indeed, I sincerely I hope this is not the case. Nevertheless, like pornography it is a literature with a strong sexual content, using many of its themes and motifs, originating squarely to address human psychological needs and fulfilling some of its social functions.

The explicitly sexual elements of the abduction phenomenon also have more than a whiff of obscenity. Not only are they repellent, but, by encouraging the more impressionable of their readers to believe that they could be the victims of similar assault by aliens, it could be argued that it depraves or corrupts. Perhaps this is too strong. There are, mercifully, no examples yet of someone citing it in court as encouraging the perpetration of sex offences. Nevertheless, the number of abductees who read this type of material before experiencing abductions of their own, including, inter alia, Whitley Strieber, strongly suggests that it is potentially highly dangerous for a certain type of vulnerable mind. Even if not technically obscene within the accepted legal definition of the term, its detrimental effects on certain individuals' mental health may strike some as an indication of obscenity within the broader sense of the term, as literary material "intended to shock or disgust." (1)

The essay also tends to consider the abduction narrative largely in terms of female sexuality and pornography. This is not an attempt to be sexist or exploitative. Although the most notorious abduction case after the Hills' was that of Antonio Villas-Boas, which undoubtedly informed and influenced the course of later abduction fantasies, most abductees are women. There are male abductees, of course, and there is much male pornography which describes scenes of passive rape, or masochistic abuse by a strong, sexually aggressive woman. The sheer preponderance of women in the abductee underground, however, suggests something profound and deeply disturbing about female sexuality and gender relations and roles in modern society.

Finally, if investigating pornography in the context of alien abductions appears morally dubious, or inappropriate, consider Gershon Legman's comments on sexual folklore: "Sexual folklore . . . concerns some of the most pressing fears and most destructive life problems of the people who tell the jokes and sing the songs . . . They are projecting the endemic sexual fears, and problems and defeats of their culture . . . And they are almost always expressing their resistance to authority figures, such as parents, priests and policemen, in stereotyped forms of sexual satisfaction and scatological pranks and vocabulary." (2) Legman is describing the intentionally humorous quality of most bawdy traditional material, but this description does fit the abduction narrative, with, of course, the exception that there is precious little intentionally funny about alien abductions.

To the sceptic, the most repellent feature of the classic abduction narrative is its strong similarity to certain forms of sado-masochistic pornography, especially in the accounts of the alleged abduction and sexual abuse of children. Indeed, "(s)ome of these accounts, if separated from the context of a purported real event, could be mistaken for paedophile fantasies of sexual torture, and regardless of whether or not these accounts have any basis in reality, it is clear that a number of publishers and magazine editors think there is nothing wrong in publishing detailed accounts of violent sexual assaults on children." (3) To this the standard reply of many abductionists is that the scenario is too fantastic, too horrific, to be the product of human imagination or fantasy. It's an assertion which is easily countered.

Not only can the technological and exobiological imagery of the abduction narrative be linked to that of science fiction, but the central motif of gynaecological or andrological examination and sexual abuse can also be clearly proven to have its own connections to the murky world of contemporary pornography.

"Abduction scenarios closely resemble women's pornography, from the soft-core rape fantasies of bodice busters to the masturbation fantasies recounted by writers like Shere Hite or Nancy Friday. Many of Nancy Friday's stories from the 1970s even have similar imagery of gynecological examinations with faintly masochistic overtones, often with occult or medical details." (4) Apart from the better known accounts of abuse by the aliens themselves, many of the abduction narratives also contain episodes in which the percipient is is raped, or forced to have sex with, another apparently "switched-off" human being. (5) Regardless of David Jacobs's comments that "This is not a sexual fantasy situation, most men and women feel that it is an uncontrollable and traumatic event", (6) it does have strong parallels in some people's sexual fantasies. As an illustration of the pseudo-medical, masochistic nature of many of the fantasies recounted by Friday, in her encyclopaedic collection of such material, My Secret Garden, she includes one woman's fantasy of being displayed for the erotic satisfaction of a football crowd while strapped to a dentist's couch. She is then wheeled into another room where her ex-husband does have sex with her, but shows no emotion whilst doing so. The parallels to the abduction narrative are immediate and striking.

First of all there is the pseudo-medical nature of the encounter itself - a surgical table in the abduction narrative, and the dentist's chair in the fantasy, the passive, physically restrained role of the female percipient, and the unemotional, impassive demeanour of the man, or alien, who finally copulates with her. Of course, there are also important differences. The most important is that the fantasy recounted by Friday is presumably that of a healthy woman who felt largely in control of her life and imagination, whilst the abduction scenario is perceived and recounted by individuals who feel themselves totally humiliated and helpless before their alien or human tormentors. Outside the abduction milieu, much of the pornography now written for women consists of stories of sexual abuse or degradation. The Captive, one of the overheated works published by Silver Mink, a publisher of "erotica" for women, is explicit in the particular form of the sexuality within its pages, both in its title and cover illustration of a naked woman bent over in some kind of stocks.

A disturbing amount of female pornography allegedly contains incest motifs, to the point where it has been somewhat cynically said, "(I)ncest has also become the standard plot twist in women's pulp fiction. Reviewing the latest batch of Black Lace offerings - pornography for women - Maureen Feely notes that "the deep, dark secret that you have to plow through hundreds of pages to discover is always - but always - what the blurb writers like to call "society's last taboo"." So it's not much of a surprise any more." (7) A few years ago, the Female section of the Daily Mail ran an article on how women betrayed themselves through such pornography took the publishers to task for encouraging, at least psychologically, their sexual abuse. At first glance, this is strange, even perverse.

Over the past thirty years society has made a determined effort to stamp out sexual abuse and give women greater control, not less, in their personal, professional and sexual relationships, a situation which has found its counterpart in much male pornography. A sizable chunk of the male sexual underground revolves around their abuse and subjugation before whip-wielding dominatrices, to the point where that image has arguably become the standard, uncontested symbol of forbidden pleasures - at least those pleasures which society chooses not to ban, but place on the top shelves of bookstores and the seedier type of newsagent. It's therefore extremely problematic why contemporary women, enjoying more freedom than previous generations, should generate and consume fantasies of their abuse and domination. The link between such pornography and the abduction experience clearly points to a deeper psychological phenomenon, one that requires greater investigation than it has hitherto received.


Although pseudo-medical examinations appear to have been an element of the UFO phenomenon almost from the very beginning, like that experienced by Harold Chibbett's female hypnotic subject in her 1947 psychic voyage to Mars, (8) by comparison with today's fraught abductee panic the contactee era is remarkably lacking, or benign, in its sexual content. Samuel Estes Thompson may have been lectured on reincarnation, vegetarianism and other mystical topics by a UFO crewed by naked male Venusians, but apart from favouring him with their religious opinions they made no attempt to assault him. Similarly, the group of male Venusians who walked stark naked out of Buck Nelson's barn told him they did so to reassure him they were just like him. They then departed in their flying saucer, but did not attempt to persuade Nelson to go with them, or otherwise do anything which would elicit the interest of Budd Hopkins. Mr G.B. may similarly have been abducted while walking along the North Canal in Marseille by tall, slender beings dressed in diving suits, but apart from sitting, weeping in their spacecraft before being allowed to leave, nothing happened to him. No medical examination, extraction of sperm or any of the other fetishistic favourites of the contemporary abduction narrative. Clearly something changed between the heyday of the contactee - the late forties and early fifties - and the onset of the modern abduction hysteria in the late seventies. The question is just what?

Possibly the lack of explicitly sexual elements within the close encounter experiences of the later forties and fifties stems from the repressed nature of contemporary society. The Lord Chamberlain's office continued to censor stage material of an explicitly sexual nature until the late sixties, and literature was subject to much the same extensive strictures. As a result, much of the material from that period which caused a furore because of its supposedly dangerous sexual nature now seems remarkably tame, even inoffensive. The early attempts at cinematic pornography, at least in Britain, tended to be salacious exposes of life in nudist camps, featuring nothing more shocking than naked people, usually women, running around playing volleyball or tennis. Rape, homosexuality and paedophilia were taboo subjects, and simply not discussed. Many members of the older generation can remember how they were in their late teens or even early twenties before learning incredulously that homosexuals existed. One female journalist for the Observer wrote at the tail end of the 80s that women and children were probably no more at risk today from sexual assault than they were during her childhood in the fifties. The difference was that people were now far more aware of the possibility of sexual assault, and responded by curtailing their children's freedom, restricting them to places where they could be safely watched instead of allowing them to wander abroad as in previous decades.

Within ufology, the key episodes introducing the motifs of medical examination and sexual contact were the abductions of Betty and Barney Hill and Villas-Boas, while the turning points for the milieu as a whole were the assassination of JFK and Watergate. Under the impact of these traumatic events, the ufological narrative turned from one of benign contact with omniscient, compassionate Space Brothers, albeit with rumours of government cover-ups, to the Darkside scenario of rape and abuse by callous, indifferent monsters with the express collusion of the civil and military administration. This occurred, however, at a time of rapid change in western sexual mores which sought to establish a more tolerant, liberal attitude towards sex. The result was the gradual establishment of pre-marital sex as the norm, rather than a dangerously aberrant form of delinquency, the legalisation of homosexuality, gradual relaxation of censorship permitting a more explicit depiction and discussion of sexual issues, and the appearance of an increasingly tedious variety of pornographic magazines, beginning with Playboy.

Possibly the lack of explicitly sexual elements within the close encounter experiences of the later forties and fifties stems from the repressed nature of contemporary society. The Lord Chamberlain's office continued to censor stage material of an explicitly sexual nature until the late sixties, and literature was subject to much the same extensive strictures. As a result, much of the material from that period which caused a furore because of its supposedly dangerous sexual nature now seems remarkably tame, even inoffensive. The early attempts at cinematic pornography, at least in Britain, tended to be salacious exposes of life in nudist camps, featuring nothing more shocking than naked people, usually women, running around playing volleyball or tennis. Rape, homosexuality and paedophilia were taboo subjects, and simply not discussed. Many members of the older generation can remember how they were in their late teens or even early twenties before learning incredulously that homosexuals existed. One female journalist for the Observer wrote at the tail end of the 80s that women and children were probably no more at risk today from sexual assault than they were during her childhood in the fifties. The difference was that people were now far more aware of the possibility of sexual assault, and responded by curtailing their children's freedom, restricting them to places where they could be safely watched instead of allowing them to wander abroad as in previous decades.

Within ufology, the key episodes introducing the motifs of medical examination and sexual contact were the abductions of Betty and Barney Hill and Villas-Boas, while the turning points for the milieu as a whole were the assassination of JFK and Watergate. Under the impact of these traumatic events, the ufological narrative turned from one of benign contact with omniscient, compassionate Space Brothers, albeit with rumours of government cover-ups, to the Darkside scenario of rape and abuse by callous, indifferent monsters with the express collusion of the civil and military administration. This occurred, however, at a time of rapid change in western sexual mores which sought to establish a more tolerant, liberal attitude towards sex. The result was the gradual establishment of pre-marital sex as the norm, rather than a dangerously aberrant form of delinquency, the legalisation of homosexuality, gradual relaxation of censorship permitting a more explicit depiction and discussion of sexual issues, and the appearance of an increasingly tedious variety of pornographic magazines, beginning with Playboy.

Of course, most of this pornography was aimed squarely at a male readership, but women weren't far behind. Hugh Hefner launched a companion magazine for women, Playgirl, while Cosmopolitan in the 1970s carried a series of nude male centrefolds for their female readers. Unlike its male counterpart, female pornography has met with mixed success. Playgirl eventually folded through lack of interest, and the author is reliably informed by his female friends that Cosmopolitan no longer carries its centrefolds. The attempts of tabloid newspapers like the Sun and Star to introduce a "page seven fella" for their female readers have similarly vanished without a trace. These attempts have had an effect though. There have been more recent attempts to launch further pornographic magazines for women, and glossy magazines like Cosmopolitan, and their counterparts in the "lad mags" usually have at least one article per issue on sensational sex tips along with photographs of scantily clad members of the opposite sex.

This drive towards a more sexually tolerant, even indulgent, society has not gone unchallenged, however. Despite its legalisation in 1969, many people are still deeply uneasy about the acceptance of homosexuality to the point where its legalisation in the armed forces and Clause 28 are heavily contested, emotive issues. Mary Whitehouse's Viewers and Listeners' Association was instrumental in challenging much sexually explicit material in broadcasting, and the religious Right, particularly in America but also elsewhere in the world, regularly condemns such liberal sexual attitudes as an assault on decency and pure family values. Nor are they alone. Elements of the feminist left have also attacked sexual permissiveness and liberalism, after initially supporting it, because of the way in which it is felt it has been used to exploit and violate women, rather than benefit them. These ideas carried a greater urgency after the feminist campaigns in the 70s against rape and domestic violence in which some of the most vociferous protagonists in the debate claimed vastly inflated statistics for instances of child abuse and saw dangerous subtexts of domination and abuse in nearly all forms of heterosexual contact. Furthermore, the advent of AIDS in the early 80s provided a strong link between sex and disease paralleling the social panic surrounding syphilis at the end of the 19th century.

This darkening of social attitudes to sex is reflected in the content of the contemporary media. The early British attempts at pornography were either the inane and prurient documentaries about nudist camps, or else comedies in which the hapless hero found himself the object of uncontrolled female desire. More recent films and literature have stressed the darker elements of human sexuality, usually with a subtext of domination, subordination, control or death. For example, 9½ weeks contained strong sado-masochistic imagery while The Silence of the Lambs contained particularly shocking and disgusting images of sexual aberration. At the level of popular literature, the Batman comic strip, particularly in the Dark Knight and Arkham Asylum graphic novels, stressed the aberrant, dysfunctional, even schizophrenic nature of Batman himself, and hinted strongly at a sado-masochistic and even homosexual undercurrent to the character. The result has been the transformation of society's view of sex, from something fundamentally healthy and natural, to a dark, obsessive force driving people towards increasingly bizarre forbidden pleasures. The uncomplicated hedonism of the Playboy clubs has been replaced by the bizarre, violent and transgressive sexuality of the fetish milieu.

This increasingly dark view of human sexual relations has its reflection in the tortured imagery of alien abductions. All fantasy, whether pornography or innocent day-dreaming, is an attempt by the human psyche to obtain experiences which would be otherwise impossible in reality. This naturally includes scenarios which the reader or dreamer would find repulsive or otherwise unpleasant in real life. War films are, for example, perennially popular at the cinema, but few people would willingly choose to experience the full horror of armed conflict, and those that do may well have compensatory fantasies of a quiet life of office work. The abduction fantasy has arisen to address deep, if obscure, human social, psychological and spiritual needs, just as pornography addresses the deepest, most basic drive of the human psyche. It should not be surprising that the imagery of one carries over into the other.

The content of much abduction material - the dehumanising medical examination and rape - shows a deeply ambivalent, even hostile attitude to sex, an attitude which is shared by the incest survivors' milieu. "Although some women who tell Jacobs and Bryan their stories belong to puritanical religious groups or are celibate, this imagery is a normal part of women's sexual fantasies. The abductees, however, seem particularly uneasy about sex . . . these desires for touch, gazing, penetration have to come from very far away, even outer space." (9)

Ellen Bass and Laura Davis's influential book, The Courage to Heal, a popular guidebook aimed at the female survivors of incest, contains a checklist of 78 effects of sexual abuse, and explicitly asks its readers whether they are aroused by fantasies of violence, sadism or incest. "The assumption that sexual fantasies are improper, incorrect, sick, is at the heart of the recovered memory phenomenon. Many women feel they must disown these fantasies, and blame them on something or someone else." (10) In the science fictional post-space age, this something or someone else naturally includes aliens or creatures from parallel worlds.

This extreme discomfort about sex may also explain the masochistic elements within the abduction experience. Most human cultures, even those which have struck westerners as being remarkably open and tolerant about sexuality, have strong taboos and prohibitions regarding sex. Strong feelings of guilt and shame, including, naturally, those surrounding sex may, in turn, take on a particular sexual form. "Moral masochism is regarded as an important form, being linked with an unconscious sense of guilt, with a paramount need for suffering." (11) At least one contemporary sex manual suggests that some women's desire to be spanked during sex possibly comes from subconscious guilt about the act and childish feelings that they are somehow being naughty and need to be punished. Needless to say, such feelings are by no means confined to women, as the scandals which continue to erupt over those prominent literary and political figures who choose to indulge themselves in le vice anglais demonstrate. From this point of view, however, the abduction experience appears to be an extremely unpleasant fantasy experienced by those who are brutally alienated from their own sexuality and feel that they must suffer for, and within their pleasures.

The pseudo-medical content of the abduction narrative is also easily explained within the context of pornography or romantic fantasy. Members of both sexes may fantasise about erotic liaisons with their doctors or nurses as an extension of much romantic material. Mills and Boon, who for decades have been synonymous with harmless romantic escapism, have had as their stock in trade an almost unceasing catalogue of hospital dramas. Such material has also provided the plots of much television medical drama, and girls' comics. Every now and then, one of the more popular tabloids announces that doctors are the favourite subjects of women's sexual fantasies, while some men on the other hand fantasise about nurses. There is a even a technical term, iatronudia, for a woman's desire to expose herself to her doctor. Since the seventeenth century, an awful amount of pornography has been published masquerading as medical texts.

The reasons for this aren't hard to find. Members of the medical profession enjoy a uniquely privileged access to their patients' bodies and minds in their professional role and it is only natural that some individuals should thus respond by making such intimately caring figures the object of fantasy. Adolescents are, at least in the mythology surrounding childhood, which, amongst other things, stipulates that "schooldays are the happiest days of your life", supposed to acquire sexual knowledge and awareness through games of doctors and nurses with members of the opposite sex. In psychiatry, both Freud and his predecessor Breuer noted the strong tendency of their women patients to fall in love with them. Freud eventually concluded that this was a result of their displaced incestuous feelings for their fathers, although possibly a better explanation was that Freud and Breuer, to particularly neurotic members of the stiflingly bourgeois Viennese upper-middle class, represented caring, omniscient male authority figures to whom their patients could confide their deepest problems and desires, and therefore suitable subjects for their affections. Sadly, as recent scandals have also shown, many doctors are all too willing to exploit this intimacy with their patients and abuse them sexually. This new element of fear and sexual suspicion in an essential relationship of trust is undoubtedly responsible for the humiliating nature of the medical examinations recounted in the abduction narratives, and the overt motifs of rape and abuse which permeate the abduction experience as a whole. Central to much female pornography, and certain abduction narratives, is the heroine's sexual subjugation by a dominating, charismatic male authority figure. One of the directors or leading writers for Mills and Boon stated on the chat show Wogan over a decade ago now that the most important element in any romance was the hero, who should be an "alpha male" - strong, ambitious and competitive. This may explain the appearance of the Tall Grey Being in the abduction narratives collected, or suggested, by Jacobs. The featureless Greys, almost devoid of individual identity, may represent fears of the loss of individuality before the collective, but as a narrative device they are psychologically unsatisfying. Star Trek found this out when they were forced to introduce the character of the Borg Queen despite the undifferentiated, collective nature of the fictional Borg society. For the characters to interact satisfyingly with their enemies, the Borg had to have a personal, individual representative. In the abduction narrative, the equally characterless, undifferentiated Greys are joined by the Tall Grey Being whom "many female abductees intuitively feel is male, a doctor, and an authority figure . . . gazing deep into her (the victim's) eyes like an extraterrestrial Heathcliff or Fabio, filling her with love and eagerness to give herself completely". (12) This strongly suggest that at the root of the abduction phenomenon is a distorted, perverted medicalised sexual fantasy, which as a matter of course must include submission before an authoritative and caring medical alpha male.

Evolutionary psychology suggests such men have an attraction for women because of the advantages they offer them and their children as strong protectors and providers. The negative aspect to this is that there are women who are attracted to violent, domineering men. It is unfortunately a sad fact that such women tend to move from one such bully to another and may even block and frustrate action taken by the police or social services on their behalf by taking their lover's side. There is absolutely no need to claim, as Eve Frances Lorgen in her "Alien Love Bite" article for MUFON has done, that the tortured, abusive relationships of many abductees have their origin in their rape and abuse by aliens. (13) It is too close, too similar, to the experiences of the victims of real human abuse on Earth to be coincidental. Its origins lie instead in the brutalised psychology of abused and dysfunctional individuals, rather than in putative invaders from the stars.

Then there is the question surrounding the abduction scenario itself. Why should apparently healthy individuals fantasise about such a traumatic event? While the apparent scenario of intergalactic explorers gathering and examining specimens from Earth lends itself to themes of abduction and medical examination, there are other forms the contact narrative could take. Real interstellar explorers would be more likely to to recover and dissect a recently deceased corpse, like the human explorers in Gregory Benford's SF novel Across the Sea of Suns, or break into the anatomy facilities of university medical departments or teaching hospitals. As a sexual fantasy, there's similarly little apparent need for such abusive, violent imagery. That great ufological pretender, George Adamski, met a number of vivacious extraterrestrial women on his interplanetary travels and even as late as 1975 Elizabeth Klarer could recount her intimate relationship with an alien spaceship captain. Nor is Klarer an isolated example of a consenting, romantic relationship between human and alien. At roughly the same time Marvel was running a short-lived strip based firmly on the then emergent mythology of alien abduction and hybridisation, it was also publishing Starlord, a superhero comic whose main character was the half-human child of an Earth woman and a crashed alien starship captain. These benign fantasies, however, are far outnumbered by the countless films, short stories and novels about alien invaders descending to carry off human females, and occasionally males, for nefarious breeding purposes. Of course, rape as one of the most horrific forms of human violence exerts a powerful fascination for the human psyche. It can be depended on to sell newspapers and "true crime" books, magazines and television series. Part of its fascination stems from disgust and a desire to protect and avenge the traditionally most vulnerable part of the population. There is, however, a strongly atavistic element to these fears.

Marriage in many technologically primitive societies is frequently by abduction. The Amerindians of Tierra del Fuego sought their wives in this way. Although many such cultures now have elaborate rules concerning betrothal and courtship, among the Kagora and Kadara tribes of northern Nigeria, for example, "(a)ll secondary marriages begin with wife abduction". (14) Nor are they isolated examples. Similar abductions of women for wives also occurred in First Nation North American, Celtic, Papuan and the earliest formative period of the Graeco-Roman cultures of antiquity, to name but a few. Although western concepts of warfare no longer encompass the abduction of women for marriage, tragically rape and the sexual abuse of the female, and sometimes male population occurs with disgusting regularity amongst the world's armed conflicts. In the relatively stable West which has not experienced war for over fifty years, the abduction phenomenon may express deep fears of the forcible appropriation of the tribal gene pool by an aggressive other produced through millennia of tribal and personal competition for women.

The victims of these abductions, following Herodotus' claim that "no young woman allows herself to be abducted if she does not wish to be" (15) - a statement apparently on a par with some of the idiotic comments about rape by the more senile judges - are not necessarily merely passive victims. In Ona Fuegian society, for example, "it was not considered proper for a new wife, whether a young girl or mature woman, to give herself away too cheaply. On the contrary, she would frequently put up a good fight and, on his next appearance, the bridegroom might have a badly scratched face and maybe a black eye as well." (16) Despite risking a beating or worse from their new husbands, abducted wives "were wooed and made much of, to prevent them from running away", (17) which, as Bridges himself noted in Tierra del Fuego, many did.

If the abduction phenomenon represents a fantasticated expression of deep human fears of tribal raiding for wives, then its incorporation into female sexual fantasies may represent a kind of sexual Stockholm syndrome, in which those abducted women remaining with their new husbands saved themselves from further violence at the hands of their abductors by developing feelings of love for them. It may also be a female response to the curious mixture of violence and genuine love in this particular form of male sexuality. This process is clearly exemplified in Ann Carol Ulrich's novel, Intimate Abduction, advertised in the August/September 1991 issue of UFO Universe under the byline "What happens when you fall in love with your abductor?" (18) It's possible that this is one of the dafter and more dangerous popularisations of the abduction phenomenon, but I doubt it. There's so much other obnoxious trash to choose from.

Another point to be made regarding the abusive content of the abduction is that a large proportion of romantic fantasies feature women as victims. Whether these are the classic formulae of adventure stories, in which the hero must rescue the heroine from the vile schemes of her enemies, or the heroines of "weepies" like Love Story, who as often as not die young, the tragic heroines of classic romance are nearly all victims. There may be a biological component to this. There is evidence to suggest that women are neurologically more inclined to depression than men, just as there is evidence that women are more prone to UFO abductions and demonic experiences because of the greater development of the left hemisphere in the female brain. (19)

On the other hand, the lower status traditionally afforded to women, the relatively limited career and educational opportunities offered to them, and social conventions that emphasise emotional display may constitute concrete social influences creating the greater incidence of depression amongst women. Regardless of the precise social or biological reasons, it is clear that some women do feel they can only achieve attention, dignity, and possibly drama and excitement through some tragedy. The abduction experience appears to fulfil those needs.

If the imagery of the abduction phenomenon shares a common origin with much conventional pornography and sexual fantasy, its literature diverges sharply from much modern erotic literature, at least in apparent intent. First of all, regardless of its content, most erotic fiction presents itself as fantasy. There are one or two pieces of dire porn which make spurious claims to reveal the hidden secrets of a particular milieu, but much of it is honest about its fictional nature. Moreover, such material is written explicitly with the reader's sexual enjoyment and arousal in mind. Indeed, Hite's and Friday's books can be considered celebrations of female sexuality as much as investigations of it.

The opposite is the case with abduction literature. It's not written to celebrate such contact. Indeed, the events described are traumatic and the percipients explicitly wish them to stop, or that they had never begun in the first place. A few may consider they have established a meaningful rapport with creatures from another world, but this is very much a consolation prize after the trauma of abuse and violation they have experienced, and continue to experience. Far more than science fiction, it is a literature of warning: that we are powerless before our violaters, from whom we can only expect more abuse and torment. There might be an additional message urging us to care for the environment, and adopt a more pacifistic, spiritually enlightened lifestyle, but the explicit message is that the human race is being collectively raped while our military and political leaders stand by and collaborate. Fear the stars. Fear your government. Trust no one.

In actual fact, in this respect the abduction literature is fulfilling one of the social roles accorded to pornography, though that of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries rather than late 20th - early 21st. To the modern reader, one of the most bizarre features of the clandestine literature of pre-revolutionary France is the seemingly incongruous mix of pornography and political message. Amid tales of sexual debauchery and the systematic abuse of the lower orders by the royal family and aristocracy, the genre also featured the exploits of sexually and politically liberated heroines whose nocturnal and diurnal adventures were interspersed with lengthy expositions of political philosophy. The result can read rather like Karl Marx would, if he had written for Playboy instead of the Neue Rheinische Zeitung.

The most obvious examples of the genre are the turgid works of the Marquis de Sade, in which lengthy and tedious descriptions of just about every cruel and abusive act imaginable are interspersed with equally lengthy and tedious expositions of his revolutionary philosophy. Again, the central character of at least one of his works, Justine, Ou La Philosophie dans Le Boudoir, is female. A woman abused and humiliated by the aristocracy, she becomes an abuser herself, gaily killing and torturing her servants with the same cruel abandon her noble guardians did to her, justifying her cruelties with philosophical arguments on the superiority of the truly liberated individual to conventional slave morality. As a moral philosophy, it predates Nietzsche by almost a century. It might have influenced him too, though there is an important difference. Nietzsche always maintained that his writings were a Gedankenexperiment: "I write for people who like to sit and think, no more."

This politicised pornography was not a break from established tradition either. From the 17th century onwards, pornography fulfilled a distinctly political function, as a scurrilous vehicle by which the disaffected attacked established authority. One of the most notorious 17th century pornographers, Ferrante Pallavicino, has been described as "an angry young man, who in his short life lambasted the hypocrisies of society, the Roman Catholic church, particularly the Jesuits, tradition and the idea of religious belief in general. He paid for his critical stance by being beheaded at Avignon in 1644". (20)

After Cromwell's victory in the Civil War, the Puritan was satirised as a hypocrite and sexual pervert, who "crept to brothels, where his special predilection was for flagellation or even sodomy". (21) The essentially passive role of the male Puritan in this pornography links it to the descriptions of abuse recounted by male abductees, which may also have undercurrents of homosexuality. Male Puritans were so caricatured, not just because of their supposed hypocrisy in stressing marital fidelity and chastity, but also as a reaction to much of the feminist activity within the English Revolution. The sectarian milieu boasted a number of strong-minded, charismatic and influential women and Puritanism as a whole was rather more egalitarian than the rest of English society. As a result, Puritan women, especially the preachers, were vilified as promiscuous, adulterous termagants, who abused and cuckolded their husbands.

The rape and homosexual abuse of male abductees may also stem from deep antifeminist sentiments, including the fear of female sexuality. Certainly the Far Right political milieu which has most vociferously supported it has a distinct antifeminist orientation and is strenuous in demanding a return to more traditional gender roles. After the Restoration, much pornography was written in the form of scurrilous satires directed against leading politicians such as Rochester, Dorset and Sedley, who were politically aligned with the Whig opposition in the 1670s.

From the Henrician restoration onwards, another favourite target of satire was the Roman Catholic church. The Catholic clergy were subject to the same accusations of hypocrisy and sexual licence as the Puritans of the Interregnum, including sexual cruelty. Several were based on real scandals, such as the excesses of the Borgian popes, and Cornelius Adriaensen in Bruges. Adriaensen was the founder of a secret order among the women of Bruges, who were persuaded to meet him in secret, undress, and be chastised for their sins. The order was eventually betrayed to the local authorities by two unwilling novices, Betteken Maes and Celleken Pieters. Although Adriaensen fled Bruges in 1563 and died in Ypres in 1581, his exploits were still making the rounds as late as 1688, when he appeared as the anti-hero of the ballad "The Lusty Fryar of Flanders". The sadistic abuse of the order's "sisters" is an obvious parallel to the female abductees' abuse at the hands of the Greys and secret government.

Needless to say, child abuse was also the standard staple of these vicious attacks. The vicious anti-Catholic book An Anatomy of the English Nunnery in Lisbon alleged that the bones of the nuns' illegitimate children were kept hidden in a place in the wall of the convent garden. Sadly, this libel is not confined to previous centuries. In Jack Chick's pathologically anti-Catholic "Christian" comic, Alberto, the same assertion is made of the murder and concealment of the remains of the illegitimate children born to monks and nuns.

During the 19th century much low literature, even if not exactly pornographic, fulfilled much the same function. This frequently chronicled the adventures of pure, virtuous women victimised and abused by members of the nobility with cruel or vicious tastes. Although not necessarily Socialist or even politically radical, this type of literature did demonstrate the sharp alienation of certain sections of the contemporary urban working class to the aristocratic order. For example, one passage of contemporary literature with an immense appeal to its largely illiterate audience of costermongers, described the heroine's imprisonment within a specially designed armchair, from which sprang manacles and steel bands. Naturally, the heroine possessed "glowing cheeks, flashing eyes and palpitating bosom" and her manacles and steel bands were "covered with velvet, so that they inflicted no positive injury upon her, nor even produced the slightest abrasion of her fair and polished skin". The reader of this particular lurid passage noted the galvanising effect it had on his audience. "Here all my audience . . . broke out with - "Aye! that's the way the harristocrats hooks it. There's nothing o' that sort among us; the rich has all that barrikin to themselves." "Yes, that the b----- way the taxes goes in", shouted a woman." (22)

The literature of alien abduction, like this antiquarian porn, performs exactly the same social function: it documents and promotes an increasingly radical alienation from the state. Like their predecessors of previous centuries, the leaders and senior bureaucrats of the modern state are engaged in a massive campaign of victimisation and exploitation. They may, with the exception of the royal family, no longer be the aristocratic seigneurs of the ancien regime, but the bourgeois politicians and mandarins of Whitehall and Washington still fulfil the same functions within this particular pornographic discourse. They are cruel and sadistic abusers, intent on perpetuating some even more secret, hideous conspiracy. It's this aspect which allows the abduction hysteria to blur and merge seamlessly with the recovered memory scandal into one gigantic conspiracy theory.

The works of Hopkins, Mack, Jacobs and Strieber are of a type, and an influence on, the equally bizarre narratives of Cathy O'Brien and her deprogrammer, Mark Phillips. O'Brien's memories, as recorded by Phillips, are about her programming and abuse as a sex slave for a series of American presidents and senior political figures as part of the Monarch mind control programme. As is to be expected from conspiracy material of this type, at the heart of the Monarch programme are the allegedly Satanist royalty of Denmark, the Netherlands, Spain and Britain, Nazi and Italian scientists working for the US military after the War and, of course, our old friends the Illuminati. Despite the lack of any documentation for all this aside from O'Brien's testimony to Phillips, it's been enthusiastically taken up by certain elements in the American extreme Right. It's discussed extensively in Contact, the magazine of the dubious revelations of Hatonn, a 9½ foot tall reptilian from the Pleiades, who utters his tedious comments and daft insights through Doris Ecker. (23) Hatonn, or Ecker, declared some time ago that there really was a Jewish plot to enslave gentiles, a la the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and that flying saucers were built by the Nazis.

Ecker has connections with Bo Gritz, one of the leading figures in the American militia movement, and has clearly influenced Texe Mars and David Icke. Unfortunately, O'Brien is not the only victim of memory obsessed with the alleged reptilian nature of the royal family and their rapacious thirst for human blood. There's also Arizona Wilder and Christine Fitzgerald. Unsurprisingly, Fitzgerald also claims to have been a friend and confidante of Princess Diana for about nine years. (24) The great concert by Jean-Michel Jarre marking the Millennium at the great pyramid of Giza, according to Marrs, wasn't harmless entertainment, but a ploy to divert attention from Masonic rituals conducted by former President Bush and the British royal family to usher in the Age of Horus. (25) Marrs cited as his authority for this ridiculous statement David Icke, already notorious for including holocaust denial material and the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in The Robots' Rebellion and later tomes.

There is, however, a profound difference between the political use of this type of material and the politicised porn of the 18th century. The heroines of the ancien regime's pervy books were spirited, liberated women adopting an active role in support of democratic, libertarian ideals. The right-wing conspiracists of the latter fin de siecle may claim to act in the name of democracy and liberty, but their ideals are distinctly authoritarian. Liberty, equality, fraternity were the watchwords of the French revolution, but this has long since departed from the far Right. All Marrs and his fellows offer is religious and racial intolerance. The women narrating this discourse are entirely passive. They have no role except as the victims of the new political elite. In this it mirrors the worst of Restoration pornography, which was expressly misogynistic. Within its discourse, "women . . . are frequently epitomised as their sexual organs". (26)

While this is undoubtedly influential in the development of the image of the cruel and debauched aristocrat, it also attests to the perennial antifeminist use of much pornography, especially that involving violence, in reducing women to objects. The violently misogynist porn of the Restoration came after the feminist upheaval of the English revolution, during which women became preachers, leaving their husbands for other men, and which increasingly stressed mutuality, companionship and affection within marriage in the theology of the more progressive and radical of the sectarians. This was in sharp contrast to the traditional, medieval conception of matrimony as a social contract for the procreation of children in which the female partner was firmly subordinate to the male. The modern narrators of such tales of perversion and exploitation are no different. The Gnostic knowledge retailed by Icke claims to set people free, but its narrators remain located firmly in their delusionary bondage. As self-professed victims, it's not surprising that they claim kinship with Princess Diana, who since her death has arguably become the most powerful image of feminine suffering in the late 20th century.

These differences aside, the parallels between the adduction literature and pornography, in form, content and social function, are too close to be disregarded. Regardless of its alleged intention to inform, rather than arouse, contemporary abduction and close encounter literature is the modern equivalent of late 18th and 19th century gothic and Decadent erotica.

Describing it as such is one thing. Dealing with it is another.

At the societal level, the masochistic elements of the abduction fantasy are profoundly contrary to contemporary trends. Most of the heroines of popular science fiction in recent years, for example have been active, even aggressive figures: Buffy, Xena, and Ripley of the Alien movies, to name but a few. Even the mass merchandising launched on the back of the abduction craze tries to play down the victim's passivity. One of the t-shirts advertised in one of the less discerning magazines described its central image of a woman surrounded by her alien captors as "their willing victim", presumably in an attempt to avoid the accusation that they were encouraging rape. It's almost as if the percipients, or their hypnotists and interrogators, were wilfully and perversely trying to retreat from their more active role into a more traditional discourse of feminine victimhood and passivity.

As traditional masculine roles and status are challenged by feminism, it's a role which an increasing number of men feel compelled to accept. Their apparently active role in the rape of female abductees is illusory. As meat puppets under the control of the Greys' telepathic will, they themselves are passive objects of lusts and desires not their own. Their experience as traumatised prisoners in their own bodies, passively observing while something else rapes and abuses through their flesh could represent a fantasticated form of alienation from their own sexuality, in which the morally censorious superego, impressed with feminist suspicions of male sexuality, tries to distance itself from the appetites of the flesh by projecting its actions onto a rapacious, omnipotent other. It may also represent a form of the terror of losing control which habitually assaults many obsessive-compulsives. Although obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterised by the intense compulsion to perform repetitive, ritualised acts, usually to ward off some threatened disaster, it may also take the form of obsessive ruminations in which the sufferer speculates obsessively on what would happen if he lost control and performed some abhorrent, usually violent or sexual act.

Cases from the 19th century include that of a man who surrendered himself to the police, fearing that he was about to murder his sister. The man stated firmly that he was devoted to her and that she was more precious to him than anything else in the world, yet he feared being overtaken by a violent, pathological mania which would result in her destruction. More recent examples include a woman who sought medical help after imagining that she was eviscerating her husband while gutting fish, for the same reason as the above Victorian gentleman. She feared that she was about to lose control, and give in to a savagely irrational urge to harm the person closest to her. Of course, it could also be that the reports of rape by "turned off" males are projections of the aggressive elements of the investigators' personalities which produced the confabulations of abuse and rape within the abduction narrative. The psychological trauma and distancing of the human puppets in this part of the scenario could be a form of passive resistance, in which the male abductee attempts to shrug off the role dictated for him by the investigator.

Regardless of the precise cause for this retreat into passivity, it represents an attempt to evade the danger of responsibility for one's own actions, something of which the percipient, female or male, can be absolved through their status as victim. It's clear from these fantasies' content that many of the percipients are uncomfortable with their sexuality. One solution may be for health professionals to reassure those vulnerable to such false memories that their sexuality is a normal, natural part of their psychology. It goes without saying that care should be taken not to encourage socially unacceptable forms, such as paedophilia, or where the percipient may act out extreme sadistic or masochistic fantasies.

A change in the broader discourse of pornographic narratives could be beneficial as well. Although much pornography is misogynistic, it was not always so. The School of Venus, published in English in 1680, which took the form of the sexual education of a young girl, Fanchon, by the older and more experienced Susanne, has been described as being "not a piece of escapist pornography but a realistic glimpse of sexual happiness" in contrast to "the neurotic and sadistic pornography of the last two centuries". (27) Human nature may not be as biologically fixed and determined as the evolutionary psychologists consider. Contrary to the predictions of the sociobiologists, it now appears "that promiscuous women can be perfectly happy and enjoy it, and that well-paid female executives have abandoned the old, supposedly hard-wired female preference for men with resources". (28)

It may be that as society changes a more female-friendly form of pornography will once again emerge. In this context even the abduction narrative may be altered for the better under the influence of porn. One anonymous female correspondent to the Fortean Times' Hierophant column noted the display of "an alien probe" in one of New York's sex shops. "While reluctant to road-test the implement in question, she did confide that she now feels significantly less alarmed at the prospect of abduction". (29) This could be seen either as the further contamination of women's sexuality by the misogyny of much contemporary sexual discourse, or as women subverting this misogyny by appropriating it for their own sexual amusement. I prefer the latter. For most abductees, I would suggest, much could be done by simply reassuring them that their sexual or emotional problems do not stem from abuse by aliens. It is with this object in mind that the above essay was written.

At the level of ufology, it should be incumbent on all researchers to challenge and submit claims of abduction and sexual assault by aliens to close, searching scrutiny. If possible, any published investigative material on abduction should be subject to the ethical constraints informing the publication of medical material. Most contemporary accounts of alien abduction are published by amateur investigators with little or no formal, recognised medical training, in a form designed to be populist and accessible. With the exception of sex manuals and other material written by doctors, gynaecologists and obstetricians with a view to encouraging people to enjoy a more fulfilling sex life, most sexological material written by academics is strongly anaphrodisiac. It's dry, clinical, considered and as about as erotically arousing as a tax form. And rightly so: the material is written to inform, not to arouse. Its writers and researchers are also under the strict supervision of ethical review boards.

One American academic who runs a course investigating human sexuality and body language was reported in the pages of the Telegraph's Sunday supplement over a decade ago now as insisting that her students take an oath to prevent them abusing their knowledge. This was after one of her students used the insights in the course to summon a strange man to her side from the other side of an airport bar and then ignored him for the rest of the evening. To the ethical researcher, the dignity of individual human beings far outweighs the possible value of his research or its publication. Any abduction material should therefore be subject to the same process of peer review, professional ethical codes, and published using the same deliberately anodyne discourse. Failing this, I would suggest that it should not be published at all. And none of it should be aimed at children.

In the meantime, if you're stuck in Waterstones facing a long and boring railway journey and your literary choice is either something by Mack, Hopkins, Jacobs et al., or the latest bonkbuster from Jilly Cooper, I'd go for the Cooper. It's probably better written and doesn't claim to be anything more than a work a fiction. Moreover, there's usually a happy ending, something which rarely occurs in the context of abductions. Better yet, I'd save the money for a decent book later on.

~David Sivier

Notes

 1. Thompson, R., Unfit For Modest Ears: A Study of Pornographic, Obscene and Bawdy Works Written or Published in England in the Second Half of the Seventeenth Century, Macmillan, 1979, preface.
2. Legman, G., The Horn Book, New Hyde Park, 1964, pp. 245-6, quoted in Thompson, R., op. cit., p. 13.
3. McClure, K., "Bogeymen", Magonia 55, p. 4.
4. Showalter, E., Hystories: Hysterical Epidemics and Modern Culture, Picador, 1997, p. 196.
5. See J. and A. Spencer, True Life Encounters: Alien Contact, Millennium, 1997, p. 148.
6. Ibid, p. 148.
7. Freely, M., "Blowing Hot and Hotter", The Observer Review, July 16, 1995, p. 12, quoted in Showalter, E., op. cit., p. 91.
8. Rogerson, P., "Fairyland's Hunters: Notes towards a Revisionist History of Abductions", Magonia 56, p. 4.
9. Showalter, op. cit., p. 196.
10. Showalter, op. cit. p. 150.
11. "Masochism", in Paxton, J., ed., The New Illustrated Everyman's Encyclopedia, Octopus Books, 1985, volume 2, p. 1040.
12. Showalter, E., op. cit., p. 192
13. See Lorgen, E.F., "The Alien Love Bite", MUFON UFO Journal, January 1999, cited in McClure, K., "Dark Ages", Fortean Times No. 129, p. 31.
14. Smith, M.G., "Differentiation and the Segmentary Principle", in Douglas, M., and Kaberry, P.M., Man in Africa, Tavistock Publications, 1969, p. 154.
15. de Selincourt, A., trans, Burn, A.R., ed., Herodotus, The Histories, Penguin Books, 1972, p. 42.
16. Bridges, L., Uttermost Part of the Earth, Century, 1948, p. 359.
17. Bridges, op. cit., p. 223.
18. Beckley, T.G., ed., UFO Universe, Vol. 1, No. 4., p. 63.
19. See Schnabel, J., Dark White, Hamish Hamilton, 1994, p. 276.
20. Thompson, R., op. cit., p. 34.
21. Thompson, op. cit., p. 41.
22. Quennell, P., ed., Mayhew, H., Mayhew's London, Bracken Books, 1984, p. 67.
23. See Fritz Springmeier, "Project Monarch: How the U.S. Creates Slaves of Satan", in Parfrey, A., Cult Rapture, Feral House, 1995, pp. 241-248.
24. McClure, K., ibid, p. 31.
25. See The Sentinel (Arizona) of 15/11/99, reproduced in Victor Lewis-Smith's Funny Old World Column in Private Eye, 24 December, 1999, p. 24.26. Thompson, op. cit., p. 121.
27. Thomas, D., quoted in Thompson, op. cit., p. 26.
28. Burne, J., "Just Deserts for Jealousy", review of Buss, D., The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy is as Necessary as Love or Sex, Bloomsbury, 2000, in Financial Times, Weekend 3/4 June, page V
29. The Hierophant, Fortean Times No. 117, p. 61.


 
Aliens take samples of semen and ovule from human abductees for their genetic experiments

When the science of ufology appeared, the phenomenon of UFO was associated with green aliens from the deep black space, studying planet Earth with scientific or military purposes. At the end of the 20th century, ufologists started talking about the intention of extraterrestrial beings to obtain the human genetic material.

On October 16th 1957 a 23-year-old Brazilian farmer Antonio Vilas Boas was working on his field, when the engine of his tractor suddenly stopped. In just several minutes the farmer saw a ‘flying disk’ above his head. The spacecraft landed on the field, and Antonio saw three humanoids stepping out. The aliens were approaching the young man. Antonio panicked, he had no idea about the aliens' intention. So made up his mind to fight. The aliens were stronger in number, they dragged the terrified man into their spaceship. They took the farmer's clothes off, tied him up to a metal table and conducted a meticulous medical examination. They apparently found their captive healthy, injected him an unknown substance and left the room. In quite a long time, Antonio recollects, the door opened and he saw a beautiful naked blond. The girl turned the young man on – the farmer was making love to the extraterrestrial female for several hours without saying a word. In one of his interviews to reporters Antonio said: “When she was walking away, she turn around, pointed at her stomach, smiled and pointed up to the sky.” 




After such a remarkable encounter, Antonio started craving for knowledge. A year later he entered the department of law of the local university, successfully graduated from it and became a brilliant lawyer. 

It became known in the 1950s, aliens often visited Earth with matrimonial purposes. Well-known American contactee Howard Menger was one of the few humans, who had a chance to meet an alien female. The 'woman's' name was Marla. She said she was born 500 years ago in the Constellation of Leo. Menger fell deeply in love with the woman from space. He divorced his wife and married Marla. The latter obtained the American citizenship and preferred the comfort of Menger's house to intergalactic flights. 

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Elizabeth Klarer was one of the first women, who allegedly had a love affair with an extraterrestrial man. In 1956 she fell in love with a 'man' named Akon. The alien took her to his home planet Metok. He seduced the woman there and Elizabeth delivered a boy. After that the alien did not need the woman anymore and he sent her back to Earth. Elizabeth Klarer died in solitude in 1994 in South Africa. She strongly believed her son Ayling remained somewhere in Alpha Centauri. There are a lot of other examples of intimate relations between terrestrial and extraterrestrial beings. Several years ago the Harward medical school proposed professor John Mack to explore the phenomenon of sexual contacts with aliens. The experienced psychologist was initially rather sceptic about his research, although he came to unbelievable conclusions. The professor studied and analyzed a lot of stories about abductions. He concluded aliens conduct genetic experiments on people. Aliens examine human beings in special labs, take samples of semen from men and samples of ovules from women. Sometimes they put a fertilized ovule in the uterus, and the woman bears the child during the first weeks of its development. Then they take the embryo out and continue maintaining its life. Professor Mack said, aliens showed hybrid babies to their mothers at times. One woman was abducted repeatedly two years after the first abduction. Humanoids showed the abductee her son playing in a special room. The boy did not look like a normal child, but the woman could not help taking care of him. Aliens welcomed the maternal instinct and let the woman stay with her baby for several months.

Modern science does not have any convincing evidence to prove sexual contacts with aliens. Nevertheless, such contacts have been happening for several ages already. Descriptions of them can be found in numerous tales, where people are abducted by fairies, dwarfs, sea monsters, in legends about demonic creatures succubus and incubus and so on and so forth. Nowadays some women say they had been subjected to sexual violence by extraterrestrial beings. A 19-year-old Californian girl gave birth to a blue-skinned and web-footed baby. The girl said she had been gang-raped by web-footed aliens. She claimed nobody believed her story and she had to keep the extraterrestrial child to prove her rightfulness.

Sexual Intercourse During Male Alien Abduction

This abduction predates the Betty and Barney Hill encounter by four years. However, this story didn't surface until about the same time as the Hill case and was overshadowed by it. It is not well known outside UFO circles but it seems to be making the rounds again. It is also an extremely strange story. I remember reading about it way back then. I may not have believed it, but it stuck in my mind.

In 1957, 23 year old Antonio Villas Boas was a Brazilian farmer by trade. For several nights he and his brother had seen strange lights in the sky with one coming so close to their home that they had to close the shutters on  the windows to keep the light out. Antonio was ploughing a field alone one night to avoid the heat of the day, when suddenly a UFO approached and landed near him. His tractor had died so he tried to run for it. Several small humanoid creatures captured him and took him into the saucer.

The creatures wore some kind of tight fitting full length outfits and soft helmets which covered all but their eyes. Lenses may have distorted the appearance of their eyes which seemed tiny with a blue tint to them.

His clothing was removed and some kind of liquid was applied to his entire body. He was then led into another room where there appeared to an examining table. Two creatures removed a small amount of  blood from his chin and left. From vents in the wall he noticed puffs of smoke or vapour that made him sick to his stomach, after vomiting he felt a little better.

Now in walks a completely naked woman with hair so blonde it was almost white. She had elongated blue eyes and very pale skin with a  concentration of freckles on her arms. She had high cheekbones, normal nose and a mouth with thin, almost non-existent lips, and a very pointed chin. Her underarm and pubic hair was almost blood red. She had the most beautiful body that Boas had ever seen.

She didn't speak, but through body language she let it be known that she was going to have her way with him, he did not seem unwilling. They had sexual intercourse twice and then she pushed him away. As she did this she pointed to her belly, smiled as best she could with her thin lips, pointed to the sky, and then left the room. Boas became fearful thinking this meant she wanted to take him away, but obviously it meant she was going to have his baby somewhere out among the stars. He was then given a quick tour of the ship by the creatures and released. He watched as the craft shot off skyward.

Any one can see why this event didn't make headlines around the globe. It's just too bloody unbelievable. Just some hot blooded Brazilian boy's sexual fantasy. Actually, his story remained untold for quite some time; it was only relayed to a Brazilian UFO researcher after some urging by Boas' doctor, who was treating him for symptoms of what appeared to be radiation poisoning. Antonio Villas Boas died in 1992 never having made a cent off his experience.

As laughable as this case is, it doesn't stand alone in UFO legend. Here are two more examples of a newer vintage.

(1) John E. Mack, M.D. writes of a fellow known as Ed, who started to consciously remember an abduction experience from thirty years earlier when he was a teenager. He recalls being floated aboard a ship where he encountered a woman with black eyes that had no pupils or irises, and thin blonde hair. He remembers being extremely attracted to her to the point of having an erection. He then went on to have sexual intercourse with her which included foreplay. However, when placed under hypnosis a much different story unfolds. It seems that instead of his fantasized love match, a machine was placed over his penis that caused arousal and ejaculation. Afterwards he was told by his abductors that his sperm would be used for ”special babies" and for "work we're doing to help the people on your planet."  Ed felt manipulated but otherwise unaffected.

(2) Budd Hopkins, a noted abduction researcher wrote of several such experiences. All are abductions with forced sexual intercourse. Hopkins just briefly touches on this one but I consider it the most important. A policeman had a similar abduction and forced intercourse experience, the exception being that the female he was mated with  was far from human. She looked just like a classic grey alien. This was so horrifying to the man that he basically begged Hopkins to tell him that his experience wasn't real. Budd agreed with him just to ease his mind, but feared  the worst. This hardened cop was obviously terrified and traumatized by the experience.

As you can see, all three cases have the common thread of UFO abduction, alien creatures, and sexual intercourse. But there the similarity ends. In the first case, which is seemingly the most absurd, Boas was an eager participant and had sex with what he considered a beautiful woman. Ed, in the second case seemed rather nonchalant about the whole situation, he thought he had had a sexual liaison, but had been duped by the aliens. The third case left the policeman absolutely horrified about his experience.

 

The vast majority of abducted men have little problem admitting that sperm samples were taken  during an abduction using some kind of mechanical device. On the other hand, most men would never be able to let it be known that they had been raped by a woman that didn't even look human. Trust me, it's a macho thing.

Male abductees report this miraculous machine somehow causes them to be aroused enough to cause an ejaculation, which is then neatly scooped up by the same. I admit that this device probably really exists, but I wonder if the stimulation to cause arousal is not forced onto the abductee by the alien's very special brand of mind control.

Anyone the least familiar with the abduction experience has heard the rumours of female humans becoming impregnated by the aliens through some sort of artificial insemination. A month or two later, they become, for lack of a better word, unpregnant. That is, the fetus just simply isn’t there anymore. Speculation is that the aliens have re-abducted the victim and removed the fetus to be incubated in one of their nurseries. This phenomenom has been reported many times over the years and has even happened to virgins.  I'm not talking about dream sequences here, I'm talking about woman that have  been diagnosed by medical doctors as being pregnant, upon their return for a regular checkup there is no sign of them having ever been pregnant, nor is there  any evidence of them suffering a miscarriage.

Basically, what I'm getting at in the above paragraph is this: If the aliens are so technically and medically  advanced that they can artificially inseminate human women, then remove the  extremely premature fetus to be brought to full term in an incubator, then why  can they not artificially inseminate their own females, whether they be alien or  hybrids? The answer is, they should be able to accomplish this with no problem.

If this is so, then there would be no need for the aliens to introduce a hybrid or alien female into the abduction room for forced intercourse with a  human male to produce offspring. An extracted sperm sample inserted into the female alien artificially would produce the needed results. Therefore, forced intercourse makes absolutely no sense, no matter how you slice it. Artificial insemination would also eliminate the possibility of the male being sterile and  wasting a perfectly good abduction.

One of the talents the aliens have is  the ability to induce images into a victim's mind to make him, or her, believe  that they are seeing things that are not really there. It seems they use this mostly for the purpose of tricking the abductee into thinking they're in more  friendly surroundings, this allows the abduction to go more smoothly. Since they are so good at this, I wonder if there ever was a woman involved in the abduction at all. Perhaps through imagery the aliens have induced the victim to believe he's actually having a sexual encounter with a female.

I can think of two possible reasons that for the aliens to do such a thing:

1. To observe the emotional and/or physical reactions of a human during the sex act. This is a possibility since the aliens do love to play with our emotions.

2. If the  male cannot be properly aroused by the alien's usual methods to cause an  ejaculation, then the added stimulus of the victim believing he is performing a  real sexual act with a woman may aid in the in a more positive outcome in  getting the sample.

This leads me to the conclusion that there was never a female, human, alien, hybrid, or otherwise, ever involved at all in any of these abductions. I believe that it was all illusion induced by the aliens into the victim's mind. However, not everyone is equally susceptible to the power of suggestion.

In the first case it would seem Boas was highly susceptible and had a great old time. He accepted everything he saw and felt without question.

In case two, it would seem that Ed was given a post-hypnotic suggestion to think that he had had a sexual encounter while abducted. Although it took thirty years for this memory to come to the surface, he remembered it without hypnosis.  Perhaps the aliens realized that Ed would sometime later recall his experience and it would be better if he remembered a pleasant experience rather than a frightening abduction. Of course, the aliens had no reason to believe that Ed would be later hypnotized and recall his true experience.

The third case,  which kind of ties it up for me, involves a police officer. Cops are rigorously trained not to be gullible. They are taught to deal with hard facts and indisputable evidence. Policemen subscribe to the old saying, believe only half of what you see and none of what you hear. It is conceivable that this very training was enough to prevent the aliens from inducing false visions into his mind. He saw both the event and the creature for what they were, hideous. But yet he says he saw the female alien right on top of him. Well, perhaps in cases like this, one of the aliens actually sits on top of the human to enhance the situation. If so, then through illusion, the victim is supposed to see the alien as a rather attractive lady while the machine hums away doing it's job in the background. A very devious but effective means of attaining what they want.

Source Material


(1) Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens, by John  E. Mack, 1994
(2) Intruders: The Incredible Visitations at Copley  Woods, by Budd Hopkins, 1987



A HARVEST OF FEAR
Steven M. Greer


The pursuit of truth requires the ability to see beyond the appearance of things to the meaning and substance behind the forms. In no field of study and research is this more essential than that of UFOlogy, a field beset by mystery, partial information, misinformation and deliberate disinformation. And, alas, in no field is there so great a deficiency of this very quality.

Take, for example, the present climate where every rumor, fantasy and observation is given a spin to fit into the preconceived framework of "alien" sinister designs and manipulations. From abductions, to animal "mutilations" to secret goings - on at
U.S. military bases, all are described in the "sinister aliens" mold. Their pervasive, if unspoken, status quo is to place all such events, real or imaginary, in the same dark and rather frightening shadows. To depart from this conventional wisdom, this unofficial party line, is to incur the derision of those self-appointed experts who, after all, know best.

It would appear that the UFO hysteria pendulum has swung full cycle: If the 1950s were the era of the gorgeous Venusians, space gods and saviors from the galactic federation, the past decade has brought us to the age of sinister "aliens" snatching mother and child alike from their bedrooms, harvesting cattle, cats, dogs and even fetuses for obviously nefarious purposes, and the collaboration of military fascists and "aliens" in a plan to dominate the Earth! For the most part, those who claim to be objective UFO "abduction" researchers, as well as UFO journalists and authors, have been swept up in this hysteria, this harvest of fear.

Even those who sincerely intend to "just describe the facts" are affected by the dominant milieu of fear, negativity and hysteria. Words such as victim, abducted, alien, mutilation, rape, sinister, disturbing, alarming, deception, controlling, manipulative, evil, and so on are accepted as automatic members of a UFO lexicon at once mandatory and unquestioned. There is an abundance of automatic interpretations and a real lack of deep analysis, which leaves us with nearly unquestioned - and unchallenged - conclusions, which are uniformly negative. Rather than objectively collecting facts, analyzing trends and making intelligent plans for future research and UFO-human interactions, there exists an increasingly powerful machine of hysteria bringing forth a harvest of fear. And facts which do not fit into this fear and negativity paradigm are either ignored or deliberately debunked as "alien" screen memories and deception.

The real victim in all of this, of course, Truth.

Truth is hard to discern amid the din of hysteria and the clouds of fear currently holding sway over the UFO community. Events are prone to misinterpretation and even censure in this environment, and those facts which do survive intact are nonetheless presented with a patina of fear and paranoia. The danger in all of this is that we may perpetuate a trend which, while initially false, may create its own reality - and its own future conflicts. We must give serious thought and much reflection to this matter, for to do otherwise may result in serious and potentially catastrophic consequences for not only humanity as a whole, but for individual observers of the UFO phenomenon as well. Indeed, we do create our own reality, and we must contemplate deeply what reality may be.

Beyond these other sweeping if not abstract concerns, there is the more immediate and ethical question of what all of this hysteria is doing to the numerous innocent percipients of the UFO phenomenon. Aside from the fact that the trust is being continuously if not unintentionally distorted, those individuals who have had close interactions (a.k.a. "abductees" and "contactees") with UFOs and their occupants are being forced, at times cruelly, to deny any positive or edifying aspects of their encounters, and are left to dwell only on the frightening and negative aspects of the experience. Is this common? Exceedingly so! We have interviewed several individuals who have stated that so-called "abduction researchers" not only enforced a certain negative and fear-engendering interpretation to their experiences, but go further and actually "throw out" any aspects of the experience which do not fit this preconceived "fear paradigm." That is, positive, loving, healing and edifying experiences with ET beings are either ignored or deemed screen memories which only constitute a further sinister deception by the ETs. Objectivity, open-mindedness - and the truth - are cast away so that these experiences may be fit into a framework of preconceived (if unstated) negative conclusions. On the one hand, these researchers will go to great lengths to establish the credibility and veracity of their subjects, only to turn around and ignore or actively debunk those aspects of the experience which do not fit the researchers' own paradigm.

If we are to pick and choose among the facts of these cases, could we not just as well content that the negative experiences are the "screen memories" triggered by the individual's own internal fears and insecurities while the edifying and spiritual memories are the "true" ones? If we are to pick and choose among the facts, why not just take the happy alternative? Indeed, one alternative is just as dishonest and dangerous as the other, and both should be avoided. It is imperative that we accept - and report - all the facts, and then analyze their meaning in a calm and non-hysterical manner. With the information and experiences we collectively posses thus far, we can neither proclaim these ET beings to be sinister Darth Vader space conquerors, nor can we assert that they are perfect space gods. Our polarization on this question is one of the chief manifestations of a collective hysteria which is at once pervasive and unproductive. And the greatest task facing us is the elimination of this hysteria and the transcendence of our own fear